The Lost Lighthouse: The Weekly Rapture 137 – Every 2 Weeks

Welcome back to The Weekly Rapture, our fortnightly pop culture news and reviews podcast!

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Big News

This week we chat about lots of things that happened at San Diego Comic Con 2019, including the trailers for The Witcher, His Dark Materials, Westworld III, Cats, Top Gun: Maverick, Picard, Watchmen and Snowpiercer, as well as all the announcements from Marvel Studios!

Now Playing – Reading/Watching/Playing
Adam – How Long ’til Black Future Month by N.K. Jemisin and The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal/Russian Doll on Netflix, Fleabag and What We Do in the Shadows on BBC iPlayer/Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order on Nintendo Switch and The Witcher III on PS4

Ian – The Tale of the Three Beautiful Raptor Sisters, and the Prince Who Was Made of Meat by Brooke Bolander, Pirate Hunters by Robert Kurson and The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells/Nothing/Resident Evil 7 and Fallout 4 on PS4 and Stardew Valley on Nintendo Switch


You can as always get in touch through Facebook or on Twitter @lost_lighthouse, email us at thelostlighthouse@live.co.uk or sound off in the ‘leave a reply’ box at the bottom of the podcast page on the website.Fancy supporting our site? Head on over to our Paypal donation page! It’s completely optional, set your own price! Even £1 helps us with hosting costs and we’d really appreciate it! Cheers!

The Lost Lighthouse: The Weekly Rapture 136 – Very Quickly Spooked Myself

Welcome back to The Weekly Rapture, our fortnightly pop culture news and reviews podcast!

Download this episode (right click and save)

Big News
This week we chat about the Nintendo Switch Lite, the Rebuild of Evangelion 3.0+1.0 footage from the Japan Expo 2019 in Paris, and the live action Mulan trailer.

Screentime – Spider-Man: Far From Home

This week we review the latest Spider-Man film, and the end of the MCU’s ‘Infinity Saga’. Beware of spoilers On(as well as unavoidable spoilers for Avengers Endgame as well) from 55:30-65-18!

Now Playing – Reading/Watching/Playing
Adam – The Last Man by Mary Shelley, Interesting Times by Terry Pratchett (Discworld 17) and The War of the Realms by Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, Matt Wilson and Joe Sabino/Neon Genesis Evangelion (started on Netflix, then switched to his DVDs), Jessica Jones Season 3 and Stranger Things Season 3 on Netflix, and Veep on NOW TV/Hollow Night on Nintendo Switch and The Witcher III on PS4

Ian – Seven Blades in Black by Sam Sykes, Death’s End by Cixin Liu and Words of Radiance (Stormlight Archive 2) by Brandon Sanderson/How to Train Your Dragon 3, Alita: Battle Angel, Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile, and Aquaman all in flight/For Honor and Resident Evil VII on the PS4


You can as always get in touch through Facebook or on Twitter @lost_lighthouse, email us at thelostlighthouse@live.co.uk or sound off in the ‘leave a reply’ box at the bottom of the podcast page on the website.Fancy supporting our site? Head on over to our Paypal donation page! It’s completely optional, set your own price! Even £1 helps us with hosting costs and we’d really appreciate it! Cheers!

The Lost Lighthouse: The Weekly Rapture 135 – Mummy Gammon

Welcome back to The Weekly Rapture, our fortnightly pop culture news and reviews podcast!

Download this episode (right click and save)

E3 2019 Spectacular!

This week we do a deep dive into E3 2019, and are joined by our pal Kii! We each go through our top 5 things from this years E3 conference (sort of) and do some honourable mentions too! Some of the main games we speak about are The Avengers, The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening Switch, Crypt of the Necrodancer – Cadence of Hyrule, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Sequel, The Witcher 3 on Switch, Spiritfarer, Animal Crossing: New Horizons, Cyberpunk 2077Final Fantasy VII Remake, Ghostwire: Tokyo and Astral Chain.

Now Playing – Reading/Watching/Playing

Adam The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes, The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard, Annihilation by Jeff Vandermeer and Roadside Picnic by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky/Tuca and Bertie and Black Mirror Season 5 on Netflix/Hollow Night on Nintendo Switch

Ian The Scar by China Miéville and Seven Blades in Black by Sam Sykes/Chernobyl by HBO and Sky/Horizon Zero Dawn on Playstation 4

Kii – The Promised Neverland by Kaiu Shirai and Posuka Demizu/Russian Doll on Netflix/The Gardens Between on Nintendo Switch

Check out any of those through those Amazon links and we get a kick back! Or you can go through here.

You can as always get in touch through Facebook or on Twitter @lost_lighthouse, email us at thelostlighthouse@live.co.uk or sound off in the ‘leave a reply’ box at the bottom of the podcast page on the website.Fancy supporting our site? Head on over to our Paypal donation page! It’s completely optional, set your own price! Even £1 helps us with hosting costs and we’d really appreciate it! Cheers!

Retrospective on R.A. Salvatore

Our pal (and Total Reroll DM) Ian likes books. Here is what he thinks of some of them.

Over 10,000,000 copies sold. Think about that. New York Time’s bestselling author R.A. Salvatore is one of the most successful writers of fantasy to have ever lived. On October 25th his latest novel Hero will be released, book three of the Homecoming trilogy following his iconic character Drizzt Do’Urden, the stoic dark elf with a heart of gold that has spawned countless imitations both in print and in game. He has written over 70 novels in a thirty year career, starting with The Crystal Shard in 1988, and in this time has also managed to write comics, graphic novels, computer games, movies, TV episodes…I don’t have time to list all of it. Luckily he has an astoundingly comprehensive website (http://www.rasalvatore.com/) detailing everything he has turned his talents to.

hero-coverThe publication of Hero, which will star the iconic Drizzt, seems a good point to have a look at what makes Salvatore so continually appealing. I’ve read dozens of his books- at least forty are set in the Forgotten Realms, the universe where the Dungeons & Dragons games are set. Salvatore famously received death threats after writing Vector Prime, a Star Wars novel in the old expanded universe (now non-canonical after Disney’s Star Wars acquisition) which killed off fan-favourite Chewbacca by smashing a moon on him. It’s a good book.

What am I trying to say here? There is a reason Salvatore is as enduringly successful as he is, and it’s a combination of character, pacing, action, and humour. Even with so many long-running series in his hands, his understanding of character motivation (even in the most fantastical settings) allows the reader to empathise with the most unlikely of individuals. Combined with this is a fantastic sense of pace and dense action (maybe after reading a few of these books in a row the fight scenes start to blur), Salvatore’s cinematic descriptions and endlessly varied and complex action scenes often combined with sincere moments of character development serve to drive narrative constantly forward.

Salvatore has described himself as a writer of ‘buddy fantasy’, with unlikely pairings and teams of characters facing adventure and threat with humour and wit. What is wonderful is that this humour, though ever present, knows when to take a backseat to plot or action or emotion, and is in itself varied in its delivery to perfectly suit the character in question- the sardonically dry wit of assassin Artemis Enteri compared to the bumbling physical comedy of dwarf druid Pikel Bouldershoulder, for example.

I love R. A. Salvatore’s work. It is consistently enthralling, escapist whilst full of relatable characters, fantastical but compellingly real in all the most compelling ways. If you haven’t read any Salvatore, it can be daunting. For a fantasy fan I’d recommend Homeland, but have a look on his website, read some excerpts, and see what strikes your fancy.

Ian (@IanTheGreen)

Book Review – Dodge and Burn by Seraphina Madsen

Our pal (and Total Reroll DM) Ian likes books. Here is what he thought of one of them.

This novel begins with killer bees and perfume in New Mexico and potions in the woods of Maine, and transforms into an adventure road trip as our hero Eugenie and her husband Benoît fleece casinos and try to plan their escape from America.

Eugenie and her twin Camille are the adopted daughters (or hostages…) of the enigmatic Dr Vargas. After their mother’s untimely demise to aforementioned bees, they are raised in the wilds of New England in a sprawling house with armed guards and a routine of esoteric training. Dr Vargas teaches gymnastics, science and survivalism, but in the woods they practice a patchwork of witchcraft and spiritualism, autodidact savants of potions and omens, rituals pieced together from their keeper’s quixotic library. Camille is the leader, the brains, the unerring strength and resistance against Dr Vargas’s barbaric regimen. Inexorably confrontation ensues, and in the end Eugenie is free and Dr Vargas defied- but Camille is gone…

The majority of the book follows Eugenie and her husband Benoît as they scramble across America. She has been unsuccessful in finding Camille, but is ever drawn onwards in that search, and in Benoît has found someone who accepts her scattershot mysticism and science and inscrutable motivations. We are plunged into a vortex of drugs and music and casual acquaintances, tribes of ravers and backwoods farmers, snakes and guns and half-remembered arcane rituals. Always, Eugenie is seeking Camille.

Dodge and Burn presents us with a narrative of a world with layers beyond what we can see, connections and synchronicities and patterns and abilities that belay the doldrums of the scientific method. In the end, there is a choice to make- which narrative is true? Eugenie’s visions and magic realism, or the harsh reality of Dr Vargas?

239df7b25844ad1c78c8d6316c22d9dc The novel is not without issues. The abundant drug-use as adjuvant to Eugenie’s mysticism actually somewhat undermines her worldview. Benoît feels somewhat underdeveloped, a simple creature utterly accepting of the narrator’s whims and oddities, though this is perhaps a relic of following Eugenie’s personal viewpoint. The final reveal in the novel is not much of a surprise, and perhaps could have been utilised earlier to more effect. These are in sum minor issues that only subtly detract from a very enjoyable novel, and indeed the pacing is such that it isn’t until the ending that you begin to question these moments.

The absorbing narrative, impressive imagery, and plethora of memorable scenes make Dodge and Burn an enjoyable and compelling read- it is a surreal trip laden with wonderful research and convincing emotion. As the first release from new indie press Dodo Ink it bodes well for their upcoming ventures and for whatever Seraphina Madsen decides to turn her hand to next.

Verdict: 8 Killer Bees out of 10

 

Dodge and Burn is out next week, and you can pre-order it here and follow the new indie publisher Dodo Ink @DodoInk or on their website

You can follow Ian too @IanTheGreen and his own writing on his website