The Lost Lighthouse: The Weekly Rapture 136 – Very Quickly Spooked Myself

Welcome back to The Weekly Rapture, our fortnightly pop culture news and reviews podcast!

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Big News
This week we chat about the Nintendo Switch Lite, the Rebuild of Evangelion 3.0+1.0 footage from the Japan Expo 2019 in Paris, and the live action Mulan trailer.

Screentime – Spider-Man: Far From Home

This week we review the latest Spider-Man film, and the end of the MCU’s ‘Infinity Saga’. Beware of spoilers On(as well as unavoidable spoilers for Avengers Endgame as well) from 55:30-65-18!

Now Playing – Reading/Watching/Playing
Adam – The Last Man by Mary Shelley, Interesting Times by Terry Pratchett (Discworld 17) and The War of the Realms by Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, Matt Wilson and Joe Sabino/Neon Genesis Evangelion (started on Netflix, then switched to his DVDs), Jessica Jones Season 3 and Stranger Things Season 3 on Netflix, and Veep on NOW TV/Hollow Night on Nintendo Switch and The Witcher III on PS4

Ian – Seven Blades in Black by Sam Sykes, Death’s End by Cixin Liu and Words of Radiance (Stormlight Archive 2) by Brandon Sanderson/How to Train Your Dragon 3, Alita: Battle Angel, Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile, and Aquaman all in flight/For Honor and Resident Evil VII on the PS4


You can as always get in touch through Facebook or on Twitter @lost_lighthouse, email us at thelostlighthouse@live.co.uk or sound off in the ‘leave a reply’ box at the bottom of the podcast page on the website.Fancy supporting our site? Head on over to our Paypal donation page! It’s completely optional, set your own price! Even £1 helps us with hosting costs and we’d really appreciate it! Cheers!

Comic Review – The Mighty Thor #703 (Marvel Comics)

Our pal Kit reviews comics for us! This is one of those reviews.

Warning: minor spoilers.

Normally I would try to avoid reviewing a comic well into the swing of a story arc, but one of my regulars today really stood out as both an issue and an arc I want to say my piece on. The Mighty Thor has been an outstanding series of comics, once Jane Foster taking over the mantle of Thor after the Odinson became unworthy Marvel have done an incredible job in portraying a different kind of Thor throughout compelling narratives and great character development. The reason I’m highlighting this issue in this arc is it appears Jane Foster’s run as the Goddess of Thunder is coming to an end (seeing as the arc title is ‘The Death of the Mighty Thor’ this shouldn’t be too much of a spoiler). This comic is bought to us by:

  • Writer – Jason Aaron
  • Artist – Russell Dauterman
  • Colourist – Matthew Wilson
  • Letterer – VC’s Joe Sabino

There has been a built up to one hell of a confrontation in this comic – Thor vs the Mangog, for those not familiar with the Mangog it’s a monster that comes back time and time again to murder and destroy as many Asgardians as it possibly can. Jane Foster however, is still fighting her own battle against cancer, which isn’t going so well. This issue really feels like this will be it, soon Jane will need to choose whether or not to pick up the hammer one last time and likely not survive or to hang it up and step down as Thor. Personally, I’ll be very disappointed to see her go, assuming she does. Jane Foster as Thor has been a favourite of mine since she took up the mantle, and I had been hoping the Odinson would get his hands on another hammer (there is more than one of them kicking about at the moment!) and for the both of them to share the role. As you may be able to tell by my prioritising this issue, it does feel like there’s an emotional weight to this and I am hoping Jason Aaron can keep up to the standard set by The Mighty Thor run and give Jane/the Goddess of Thunder the send-off she deserves (assuming again, this does happen!)

Dauterman and Wilson’s art has to juggle two tones of story – one where Jane is battling cancer and facing the decision of her life and one where the Mangog tears through Asgard. To me, they handle this well, with duller tones during the Jane Foster focused panels and vibrant bright tones in Asgard. The Mangog is very, well, orange and is a villain who could easily look a bit ridiculous if handled incorrectly, but I think the artists do a great job in portraying how terrifying it must be to stand up against. I also very much enjoyed Sabino’s lettering, and the panel breaking screams during the battle between Asgardians and the Mangog.

Final Verdict

The build up to the finale for The Mighty Thor is showing a lot of promise, Jane’s characterisation and how caught she feels between her two lives is very compelling. While I don’t want to see the Mighty Thor go, this run of comics has been successful and in both Marvel and DC characters do happen to have a habit of coming back… like the one who gets a cameo on the final page!

Score: 9 Rainbow Bridges’s out of 10

Comic Book Review – Star Lord #1 (Marvel Comics)

Our pal Kit reviews comics for us! This is one of those reviews.

Warning: minor spoilers.

“It’s not MY fault, I’m stranded on Earth with your STUPID drinking rules!.” Star-Lord

With the trailers for Guardians of the Galaxy 2 both out and a huge success I thought I’d pick up with Peter Quill in the main comics this week. Marvel are starting a new solo run with this Guardian of the Galaxy, bought to us by:

  • Writer – Chip Zdarsky
  • Artist – Kris Anka
  • Colourist – Matthew Wilson
  • Letterer – VC’s Cory Petit
star-lord-cover

Cover by Anka

We pick things up after the events of Civil War 2. It’s not something you need to know the background on fortunately, we do find out early on though that the Guardian’s ship has been wrecked and Peter is stranded on Earth. Which he’s spending his time doing exactly what I plan to on Christmas Day – drinking far too much before lunch. He tries to make the best of things while he’s stuck on Earth by reconnecting with friends and getting out for a bit.

The scope of the comic is small, Star-Lord isn’t adventuring around the universe saving everyone but trying to cope with being bought down to Earth, literally. It doesn’t help that he is not the most popular vigilante amongst Marvel heroes. I wasn’t familiar with Zdarsky or Anka’s work before this comic, however their take on our hero trying to deal with day to day life is a great way to introduce new readers. We’re also treated to a couple of cameos which lighten the overall sombre mood of the comic.

star-lord-interior

Art by Anka, Wilson & Petit

The art at first appears simple but effective, but manages to match the fluctuating mood throughout the comic – light and fun to sombre and tense. The colouring feels very clean as well, Wilson and Anka teaming up to deliver a sense of texture and detail to the panels. Petit keeps the lettering minimalist to allow for broad and colourful scenes throughout the issue. Star-Lord also spends a fair bit of time shirtless if that’s your thing. However, although Anka and Wilson are great with chests, how are they with hands?

Can Anka draw hands? Being critical there are a couple of instances where the hands aren’t quite up to the rest of the art. That isn’t to say they’re bad as such, but simply aren’t quite as good as the rest of the art throughout the issue – one passer by caught in a cross fire and in a guest appearance by Wolverine his claws appearing to come out of his fingers Lady Deathstrike style, 7/10 for hand drawing skills!

Final Verdict

I really dug this as a start to a new series. Focusing on the small stuff and giving us a character in a more relatable environment helps make them more human and gives a surprising weight to the situation when things do go to hell. The writing and art team have also got off to a promising start and I’m looking forward to the rest of the work they can deliver.

Score: 8.75 Sarcastic Voice Messages out of 10

 

Comic Book Review – The Unworthy Thor #2 (Marvel Comics)

Our pal Kit reviews comics for us! This is one of those reviews.

Warning: minor spoilers.

“Now his friendship is clearly yet another thing of which I am no longer worthy.” – Odinson

This week, I felt it would be interesting to pick up The Unworthy Thor Issue #2:

Writer – Jason Aaron

Artist – Olvier Coipel

Colour Artist – Matthew Wilson

Letterer & Production – VCs Joe Sabino 

If I’m honest I feel Marvel have been underperforming across many of their comics, however the ongoing situation with the Thor characters, specifically Thor and Odinson has been something Marvel have been keeping up to their normal high standards on. As with all comic book de-powerings/incapacitations/deaths etc. Odinson will of course regain the mantle of Thor eventually, though I’m expecting him to share it with the current Thor once he’s worthy once again. The current Unworthy Thor series is certainly indicating this will both be the case, and his story of redemption.

The story picks up with the Odinson and Beta Ray Bill teaming up, to set out and find a supposed extra hammer (read the very good Thors series, part of Battleworld last year). Their deep friendship conveyed in the respect Bill still shows Odinson in the opening panels really stood out and kicked this issue off to an excellent start. The issue also contains a particularly good dream sequence where we get a snapshot of Odinson’s current psyche. One panel in particular stands out for showing Odinson’s current relationship with his hammer, the weight of the situation is crushing him and he’s helpless beneath it. We’re also introduced to the first villain of the story as well, The Collector. As an adversary he has a unique drive and motivation to all of his schemes, which sets him apart from your standard comic book villain.

Coipel and Wilson do excellent work with the art, shifting the colouring and visuals to suit the tone of comic. Sombre during Odinson and Bill’s reunion, bright and flashy during combat and shades of grey during Odinson’s nightmare. As well as this every lead character feels powerful and imposing. In an issue with many strong personalities this is well reflected in the art. There’s more text in this issue than the last, the conversations showing Odinson’s character development and promising good things from this series. Sabino does excellent work of weaving the reader’s eye through the character conversations, without detracting from Coipel and Wilson’s work. This of course ignores the big question though: 

Can Coipel draw hands? The number of hands on show are limited throughout the issue. Due to the large scale of the combat they’re usually small during the fight scenes and during the conversations the emphasis is so often on character’s faces as opposed to their whole body language. Hands are drawn perfectly well when they are shown, unfortunately this is less often than I’d like to see during conversation, though only because they can add to personality so effectively. 7/10 for hand drawing skills!

Final Verdict

Aaron is off to a great start with what could well be a fantastic redemption story. The twist villain at the end promises to up the ante throughout the series and the artists are certainly giving it the high standard it deserves.

Score: 9 G.O.A.Ts out of 10

Comic Review – The Unworthy Thor #1 (Marvel Comics)

Adam reads as many comics as he can afford. Then he reviews one every other week.

This week I picked up The Unworthy Thor #1, the start of a new miniseries starring the Odinson as part of the Marvel NOW! initiative. The Unworthy Thor was written by long time Thor writer (and writer of the current Mighty Thor series) Jason Aaron, with art by Olivier Coipel, colours by Matthew Wilson and letters from VC’s Joe Sabino.

unworthy-thor-cover

Cover by Coipel

Two years ago in the Original Sin event, Nick Fury whispered a secret into Thor’s ear that caused him to become unworthy to wield the hammer Mjolnir, dropping the weapon on the surface of the Moon unable to lift it again. Since then, Mjolnir has been wielded by Jane Foster, taking the Odinson’s place as Thor and doing a damn good job of it. But what of the Odinson? Things haven’t been going well for him. He lost his hammer. He lost his arm (he did get a fancy new one though). But now, in the wake of last year’s Secret Wars, there is a new Mjolnir in the regular Marvel Universe, and the ex-Thor is determined to find it.

Jason Aaron has been writing this character for a long time now, and it’s very clear that he know exactly how the Odinson thinks and why he works so well when written well. Marvel do have a recent issue with holding out on a secret or plot point a little too long before the reveal (looking at you Cyclops post-Secret Wars), and the mystery of what Fury said to Thor has been held onto for so long now it is in danger of being underwhelming regardless of the gravity when it is finally revealed. However, the writing in all of Aaron’s various Thor comics since has been so strong that it is easy to forgive this point and just enjoy the story as it comes. The Unworthy Thor is no exception, with plenty of mystery and action, along with the return of a fan-favourite character.

unworthy-thor-interior-2

Art by Coipel & Wilson

Coipel’s art, probably better called ‘The Shirtless Adventures of the Odinson’, is hugely detailed and brims with a sense of the epic, and be it in the desolation of outer space or in the brutal brawls throughout the book there aren’t many artists better suited to this series. And he draws a damn impressive goat. I’ve extolled the virtues of Wilson’s colours multiple times before, but it does bear repeating. His colours bring an extra level of vibrancy to an already great looking issue, with the scenes on the Moon and in space looking colder, and the action beefier because of them.

The Unworthy Thor #1 is a great companion to the superb Mighty Thor, with gorgeous art and an interesting set up that promises a lot for the future of the Odinson and his corner of the Marvel Universe. I’m hoping that we do finally find out the reason for the unworthiness, but even if we just get a good Thor story out of it that would be fine too! Check it out at your local comic shop or digitally now.

Score: 8 Mjolnirs out of 10

 

Check out the recent collected stories that lead into The Unworthy Thor,  and support the site by picking them up through our Amazon links! Thor becomes unworthy in Original Sin; a new Thor picks up the hammer in Thor: The Goddess of Thunder & Who Holds the Hammer?; the Marvel Universe collides with the Ultimate Universe, and a new Mjolnir appears as a result in Secret Wars and Thors; and Jane Foster continues her adventures post-Secret Wars in the first volume of Mighty Thor: Thunder in her Veins.

Comic Review – Captain Marvel #1 (Marvel Comics)

Adam reads as many comics as he can afford. He missed reviewing them while he tries to write up his PhD thesis, so every other week he’ll be reviewing of one of them, with potential minor spoilers.

Another week and another #1 issue from Marvel! This time I picked up Captain Marvel #1, written by Agent Carter showrunners Michele Fazekas and Tara Butters, drawn by Kris Anka, coloured by Matthew Wilson and lettered by VC’s Joe Caramagna.

Carol Danvers AKA Captain Marvel is off to space again, although instead of the slightly further reaches of the cosmos where the Guardians of the Galaxy hang around, this time she’s off on a two year deployment commanding the Alpha Flight Space Station 250km above the Earth, acting as its first line of defence against interstellar threats (although a GotG member does make a brief appearance…). There she meets her command, including Alpha Flight members Puck, Sasquatch, Aurora and the prickly Lt. Commander Abigail Brand, and very quickly chooses to shirk her typical desk-job and administrative duties in favour of punching earth-bound ships and meteors. Which really sounds like a lot more fun.

Captain MarvelConsidering this is their comic book writing debut, Fazekas and Butters do a fine job here crafting a light-hearted yet meaningful first issue, blending a sci-fi drama in the style of Star Trek with cosmic superhero action. Carol’s character seems largely unchanged from Kelly Sue Deconnick’s run, so there is a familiarity to hold on to as we launch into this new arc. The supporting cast looks like it will be very interesting dynamic, with Carol butting heads with Brand while simultaneously quickly becoming best buddies with the affable Puck.

Anka’s art is expressive and bold, with some heavy and angular line work that retains a simplicity that works well with the light-hearted tone of the book. The character and facial work within the giant high-tech space station has sense of warmth within the sterile yet well-detailed environments, while the hugely vibrant space action is a real treat. Wilson’s colours are definitely an important part of that vibrancy, not just in the combat but also between the various character designs and uniforms. Danvers herself looks especially good with Anka’s slight tweaks for her new costume and the stark colours from Wilson.

If you’re looking for a fun and exciting sci-fi superhero comic, look no further than Captain Marvel. The ensemble cast works well to round out the book, but this is still very much Carol Danvers’ story and it should be a great ride seeing where she goes next. Check it out at your LCS or digital comics platform.

Score: 8 Hala Stars out of 10