Comic Review – The Green Lantern #1 (DC Comics)

Our pal Kit reviews comics for us! This is one of those reviews.

“So I’m back in the saddle?” Hal Jordan

Cover by Sharp and Oliff (DC Comics)

This week DC started a new run on The Green Lantern. While his series have never been ones I’ve closely followed, I’m familiar enough with the Lantern lore to know how impressive they can be and how good the stories are by reputation (I can’t say I know him from the movies as I did my best to steer clear of the Green Lantern one…). This new series is written by Grant Morrison of all people, so there is a huge name in comic book history leading on this. With both of these in mind I felt I had to give it a look this week. The cover is very eye catching as well. Hal Jordan plastered in his trademark green is stood front and centre, proudly drawing the eye and setting a powerful tone for this new series. This comic is bought to us by:

  • Writer – Grant Morrison
  • Artist – Liam Sharp
  • Colorist – Steve Oliff
  • Letterer – Tom Orzechowski

The opening of the story brings us to the Green Lanterns, in their wonderful multiform and colourful variety battling it out with bunch of alien pirates. This forms the backstory and set up to the series and brings to any totally new readers an understanding of who the Lantern Corp are and the scale of the problems they deal with. We then get to see Hal Jordan, and in a scene very reminiscent of the very first time he picked up a power ring, how he gets back in the game. We get to know the type of person Hal is, how he very much knows how to handle himself around hostile aliens, and his status within the Corp. Naturally, towards the end of the issue we get the set up for the on-going plot this series will cover and the real challenge Hal will face, with the entire Corp under threat from a foreboding prophecy of betrayal.

Art by Sharp, Oliff and Orzechowski (DC Comics)

Sharp covers the art throughout this issue. His resume within the comic industry is hugely impressive and he is more than up to the task to deliver to the standard required by one of DC’s top tier characters and working beside the likes of Morrison. Sharp’s line work is incredibly detailed and adds a sense of gravity to the issue, with Oliff adding a colour pallet true to the Green Lantern’s classic shade of green. There is also a very interesting page where Hal while being heroic within the context has a noticeably sinister design to him. I have a sense reading this that Hal may have a dark streak that could come into play in this series. The creative alien designs also bring a sense of weird and wonder to the issue.

Final Verdict

This is a very interesting start. Morrison and Sharpe make an excellent team and I’ll be reading further issues as they come out. I certainly hadn’t realised though quite how many different Corps there now seems to be! Seems there a lot more than the visible rainbow spectrum now!

Comic Review – Wonder Woman: Rebirth #1 (DC Comics)

Adam reads as many comics as he can afford. Then he reviews one every other week.

DC’s Rebirth continues this week, and if my total failure to pick up a few of last week’s one shots yesterday is anything to go by, it is going fairly well for them. It’s at least selling well, and most of last week’s Rebirth output seems to be going down positively too (check out Kit’s review of Batman: Rebirth from last week). This week in particular I was looking forward to Wonder Woman: Rebirth, having dropped off the character since the end of Azzarello and Chiang’s New 52 run. The return of Greg Rucka to the series has had a lot of people excited (myself amongst them, as he is one of my favourite writers), and on this issue he was joined by the two art teams of Matthew Clark on pencils, Sean Parsons on inks and Jeremy Colwell on colours for the first 14 pages, and art from Liam Sharp and colours from Laura Martin for the last 6 pages. Jodi Wynne lettered the whole book.

WWrebirth

Cover by Sharp & Martin

Wonder Woman: Rebirth is a comic about truth. More specifically the lack of it. Diana of the Amazons finds herself disconnected from the people she is saving, in part because they are unsure of who she really is. And they are not alone. She thinks back on her life up to this point, and much of it is split between two different realities with an uncertainty that goes right back to her birth: was she formed from clay, or is she the daughter Queen Hippolyta and Zeus? Faced with a schism of her own past and questioning her whole life, Wonder Woman uses the Lasso of Truth on herself, tying it around her arm and asks herself who she really is. Diana, princess, daughter of Hippolyta, tenth queen of the Amazons. And she has been deceived. And she intends to find out who has done this to her and, possibly more importantly, why?

This is a story about the fluidity of serialised storytelling and the malleability of the origins of superheroes, but it is also a metatextual look at the inconsistencies and complicated facets of Wonder Woman that appear both presently and in her past. The initial disconnect with the women she saves at the start of the issue represents a disconnect with the audience, which Rucka deftly renders into a story point that leads up to Diana literally crushing and stepping out of symbols of her New 52 guise. In that way, the issue continues the Rebirth theme that someone is fabricating reality. However, here it feels much more personal. Rucka’s Wonder Woman is intensely reflective here, but rather than wallowing in self doubt as the character has recently, she maintains a graceful strength in the face of her doubt with regards to reality itself. It’s this simultaneous intensity and care to her introspection that displays a perfect characterisation from Rucka that will serve as a through line as the story moves forward.

Art by Sharp & Martin

Art by Sharp & Martin

Both of the art teams are very strong in Wonder Woman: Rebirth, and while they are distinct from each other the transition works in a way that feels natural rather than jarring. Clark and Parsons produce a sharp and familiar rendering of Diana (with a superb double page spread of her smashing through the lies), with Colwell’s bright colour palette rounding off the art in the first section that feels rooted in the New 52 stylistically. When she essentially steps out of her New 52 costume and heads to Olympus for answers, the comic switches to Sharp’s slightly finer lines and rich, overgrown visuals that almost moves the whole genre of the book to more of a classical fantasy leaning – something that suits the character and her world just fine. Sharp’s gorgeous art is completed with colours awash with an ominous sunset from Martin, resulting in a dark and brooding tone that makes the air around seem thicker with heat and dread.

When Wonder Woman returns in two weeks it will be as one of DC’s twice-monthly books. Interestingly, Rucka will be splitting these into alternating stories that presumably will intertwine or connect down the line, but will be set at different times in Diana’s life. Each of the two will have a different art team, which will provide an internal consistency within the story while also giving each a great deal of distinction. The first story, set in the present day, is ‘The Lies’. This will presumably be picking up where this Rebirth issue left off and Liam Sharp will be continuing with that. If his work on this issue is anything to go by, that is going to be a hell of a good book and I hope Laura Martin is sticking around to colour it. Issue #2 will be the start of the alternative story ‘Year One!’, which has a reasonably self explanatory title but I expect will go into where some of these lies and fabrications have taken root. This story will be drawn by Rucka’s Black Magick collaborator and all-round excellent artist Nicola Scott, and the preview art shows a much brighter and youthful take that I’m looking forward to just as much.

Wonder Woman #1 cover by Sharp

Wonder Woman #1 cover by Sharp

When DC first announced that several of their books would be going twice-monthly I was worried. After Wonder Woman: Rebirth I’m still worried, but more for my bank account than my ongoing interest in DC Comics. The set up for the series is compelling, but the quality in the whole creative team in this issue and seeing one arm of what is to come working so well here is what will be bringing me back in two weeks. If last week is anything to go by head to your local comic shop soon before it sells out, though I think DC are reprinting all of the Rebirth books anyway so keep an eye out. This is definitely one to check out.

Score: 9 Crushed Helmets out of 10