Comic Book Review – The Unworthy Thor #2 (Marvel Comics)

Our pal Kit reviews comics for us! This is one of those reviews.

Warning: minor spoilers.

“Now his friendship is clearly yet another thing of which I am no longer worthy.” – Odinson

This week, I felt it would be interesting to pick up The Unworthy Thor Issue #2:

Writer – Jason Aaron

Artist – Olvier Coipel

Colour Artist – Matthew Wilson

Letterer & Production – VCs Joe Sabino 

If I’m honest I feel Marvel have been underperforming across many of their comics, however the ongoing situation with the Thor characters, specifically Thor and Odinson has been something Marvel have been keeping up to their normal high standards on. As with all comic book de-powerings/incapacitations/deaths etc. Odinson will of course regain the mantle of Thor eventually, though I’m expecting him to share it with the current Thor once he’s worthy once again. The current Unworthy Thor series is certainly indicating this will both be the case, and his story of redemption.

The story picks up with the Odinson and Beta Ray Bill teaming up, to set out and find a supposed extra hammer (read the very good Thors series, part of Battleworld last year). Their deep friendship conveyed in the respect Bill still shows Odinson in the opening panels really stood out and kicked this issue off to an excellent start. The issue also contains a particularly good dream sequence where we get a snapshot of Odinson’s current psyche. One panel in particular stands out for showing Odinson’s current relationship with his hammer, the weight of the situation is crushing him and he’s helpless beneath it. We’re also introduced to the first villain of the story as well, The Collector. As an adversary he has a unique drive and motivation to all of his schemes, which sets him apart from your standard comic book villain.

Coipel and Wilson do excellent work with the art, shifting the colouring and visuals to suit the tone of comic. Sombre during Odinson and Bill’s reunion, bright and flashy during combat and shades of grey during Odinson’s nightmare. As well as this every lead character feels powerful and imposing. In an issue with many strong personalities this is well reflected in the art. There’s more text in this issue than the last, the conversations showing Odinson’s character development and promising good things from this series. Sabino does excellent work of weaving the reader’s eye through the character conversations, without detracting from Coipel and Wilson’s work. This of course ignores the big question though: 

Can Coipel draw hands? The number of hands on show are limited throughout the issue. Due to the large scale of the combat they’re usually small during the fight scenes and during the conversations the emphasis is so often on character’s faces as opposed to their whole body language. Hands are drawn perfectly well when they are shown, unfortunately this is less often than I’d like to see during conversation, though only because they can add to personality so effectively. 7/10 for hand drawing skills!

Final Verdict

Aaron is off to a great start with what could well be a fantastic redemption story. The twist villain at the end promises to up the ante throughout the series and the artists are certainly giving it the high standard it deserves.

Score: 9 G.O.A.Ts out of 10

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