Comic Review – Copperhead #1

Adam reads as many comics as he can afford. Every week he is going to attempt a mini review of his favourite one, with potential minor spoilers.

This week, along with the couple of other creator-owned titles and a few of the Futures End issues (of drastically varying quality) from DC’s September event, I picked up Copperhead #1 from Image Comics, written by Jay Faerber, with art by Scott Godlewski, colours from Ron Riley and letters by Thomas Mauer.

Copperhead is a sci-fi western (I love a sci-fi western) set in the titular town on the planet of Jasper. Our main character, Clara Bronson, is moving to Copperhead to start a new life with her young son Zeke. Taking up the recently vacated Sheriff’s position (or ‘Sherif’), Clara and Zeke are greeted by her surly Deputy Budroxifinicus (or ‘Boo’), one of many of the various species living in Copperhead. They soon head out to a domestic disturbance, where Deputy Boo doesn’t really help, and return to the station to find the local mine owner and his artificial human bodyguards, seemingly running some form of racket (and whose dialogue, I’m pretty sure, is impossible to read in anything but a sleazy Southern accent). Before Clara and Zeke can settle in to their new home that evening, Boo calls reporting a murder that she has to head out to investigate. And Zeke suffers from Carl Grimes syndrome, because he doesn’t stay in the damn house when he is told to.

The story is interesting, if a little slow in building the groundwork for the world and the characters. The basic premise is good though, like a cop show but set in a desolate frontier town in the middle of nowhere. In a letter at the back, Faerber describes his original idea as ‘Deadwood in space’, which is pretty accurate. The dialogue is strong, and a few pieces are teased about Sheriff Bronson’s past and a presumably fairly large and possibly interplanetary war that ended at least relatively recently. The art was great, with the sand-blasted barren Copperhead looking bleak and bringing out the varying colours of the different species. The night-time scenes at the end of the issue were particularly vivid and gorgeous despite being a little gruesome. It actually reminded me of Fiona Staples’ art, with the alien creatures and locales blending perfectly with the humans mixing in with them.

This felt like it could have been set on a planet in the Firefly universe if there were a few alien species (and not just Dead Bessie), and for that reason alone I was bound to enjoy it. The story, while a slow burner, is intriguing and I liked all the characters a great deal. Check this out in your local comic shop, or digitally with your recently unveiled pointless watch phone or whatever.

Score: 8 Bullet Ridden Uniforms out of 10

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