Comic Review – The Empty Man #1

Adam reads as many comics as he can afford. Every week he is going to attempt a mini review of his favourite one, with potential minor spoilers.

No review last week, long story short I was insanely busy. The few things I did read were largely ongoings or mid-series so I decided to skip a review. Anyway, this week I read The Empty Man #1 from Boom! Studios. It was written by Cullen Bunn, with art by Vanesa R. Del Rey, colours from Michael Garland and letters from Ed Dukeshire. I heard about this last week, so picked it up when I saw it on the rack.

The Empty Man takes place one year since the first case of the ‘Empty Man’ disease, a mysterious illness with unknown causes or transmission, that causes suffers to hallucinate or descend into a mad rage, with them either dying or entering an empty catatonic state. The FBI and the CDC investigate cases of the disease, hindered by various cults that surround it mistaking it for the work of God or some other delusion. The issue uses religion to frame the story too, which highlights this cultist turn later on for it’s general craziness. We follow Special Agents Langford and Jenson on a case of a family with the parents having succumbed to the Empty Man, and the children missing. The agents try to find out what happened to the kids, interviewing neighbours and interrogating suspects.

I’ve not really done the story justice, but I don’t want to give too much away. I got a real True Detective vibe from it, with the whole issue having an excellent sense of impending dread throughout all of this, and the characters seemingly knowing as little about the condition as the reader. The story is very well paced and the dialogue is sharp. I really liked the layout of the interviews 1-8 with the neighbours being so brief they felt like vox-pops. The art is really gloomy and shadowed, which just adds to the mysterious feeling. There were maybe two panels where I wasn’t sure exactly what was going on straight, in the shower scene (not nearly as sexy as it sounds) and the last page, but I got it from dialogue or the next few panels. Everything else looked great, and there is one panel that was so terrifying that I’m certain it is going to be a fixture in my nightmares for the next few nights.

I love a good mystery, and this series presents a very interesting one. The art was great, complementing the ominous overshadowing of the story. I’ll be carrying on with The Empty Man, and I’m definitely recommending people pick this up.

Score: 8.5 Fortunate Ones out of 10

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